Julie Carter

Welcome to the West as I see it

Within these pages, you will find the end result of a lot of living and laughing, finally put between book covers to share with the world. A laugh is never a better laugh than when it can be shared and shared again.

I hope you choose to own a copy of my book, Cowgirl Sass and Savvy. It is a selection of some of the first stories individually published in a syndicated column by the same name that I have written weekly since 2002. They offer you a peek into ranch and cowboy life that isn't what you see as you drive by or what you read in the glossy slick magazines selling cowboy clothes, furniture and adventures.

And most of all, I hope the stories bring you, at the very least, a smile and a good laugh. No better gift could I offer you.

I also offer you a glimpse of this rural area as I see it through my camera lens. Shop the Mercantile page for posters that I have combined my photography with words I have written. Also there are calendars showcasing some of my favorite photos from this year. A link to my landscape photography website will let you browse through what I see when I travel down the dirt roads of the West.


Julie's Weblog

November 29, 2015

Killjoy Christmas Shopping-saga of the toy livestock hauler

Filed under: General — Julie Carter @ 8:09 am

the toy

Cowgirl Sass & Savvy by Julie Carter

This is the time of year that I usually create a funny but accurate shopping list for the ranch wife or the cowboy that may be looking for something special for his sweetheart. Doing a little looking around, I jumped track to a rant that is swelling up in cattle country over a toy livestock hauling truck.
They are cattle trucks where I come from, or “bull wagons.” And yes, sheep and other assorted ranch and farm animals are hauled in them too.
It seems that a group of animal rights activists finds nothing amusing about kids playing with a livestock truck sold by Walmart (and other places too, they just went after the most visible big guy).
The online petition started this month by a vegan activist from Toronto refers to it as a “toy slaughter truck” and the petition states, “Normalizing the enslavement and murder of animals to kids is not OK.” Seeking 15,000 signatures and as of this week, there were 12,824 supporters.
The comments under the petition are priceless in both their reality and those I would call “completely gone off the deep end.”
It was pointed out in a response that these trucks are toy models of an industry that moves livestock from one place to another and claimed a 95% ratio of location change usage to actually taking animals for slaughter. The toy is labeled “Peterbilt Model 579 with Livestock Trailer.”
The other side of the issue jumped off the ledge with “The reality is violence. Do not support desensitization of children. This ‘toy’ is no different than a slave train combined with a coroner’s wagon. Auschwitz mentality is immoral & degrading.”
Another said, “Glorifying and normalizing slavery, abuse and slaughter is just disgusting.”
Seriously people? I would bet all that is mine not one child anywhere that found that truck under the Christmas tree would look at it and say, “Oh look, Santa brought me a slaughter truck.”
I have no delusion that my story here will change the mindset of those so embroiled in this leap from the toy shelf to Auschwitz, but it makes me feel better to shed a little more light on the insanity of this world. I am, however, a little concerned that those trucks hauling vegetables from farm country might be next on the list. Will the vegans attack their own?
Desensitizing children? Enslavement and murder of animals? Oh boy, it’s a good thing I’ve got a word limit that comes with this missive. My vote would to be to remove most television shows cartoon programs included, and video games. I would also do away with a long list of things people that claim to be free-thinking, free-willed adults do on a daily basis that “desensitizes” us all before taking a toy truck off the shelf. It is a TOY. A symbol of a tool used daily in the livestock industry. Period. Ban that, then ban the knives that chop the vegetables.
And, about that doll that magically poops little charms after feeding her water. It comes with the suggestion that the doll owner then make a bracelet out of the charms. Hey, I don’t make this stuff up! What kind of reality is that for a child? I suggest there is possibly psychological damage done by this doll to children who will someday actually have to change a real baby’s diaper … well, I leave it to you.
So on behalf of the livestock industry, the farming industry and the lucky charm industry, happy holiday shopping. By the way, those livestock hauling trucks are still available for $29.99. Buy two. Make a point.
Julie, who is charmless but has a previously owned by son toy livestock truck, can be reached for comment at jcarternm@gmail.com.

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